I’m an MBA student with career goals. I’ve known for most of my life that I wanted to figure out a way to make a living writing, and while I usually envisioned making that money from my fiction, I’ve since discovered that I also love writing on the internet. This dovetails nicely with my course of study: business, and specifically marketing.

What is Content Marketing, Anyway?

The Oxford English Dictionary defines content marketing thusly:

Content Marketing

noun

a type of marketing that involves the creation and sharing of online material (such as videos, blogs, and social media posts) that does not explicitly promote a brand but is intended to stimulate interest in its products or services.

This is also known as “inbound marketing,” because it brings prospects “in” instead of the marketer “reaching out” with ads.

A huge amount of the content you read online, whether you realize it or not, can be considered content marketing. Some of it is explicitly so, with sponsored blog or social media posts (this is called “native marketing.” Most platforms require a sponsored tag for this sort of content).

One of the core realizations I had in my undergrad studies is that social media turns everyone into a marketer. Your friends on Facebook or Snapchat or what-have-you curate their lives in order to better support their personal brand, whether they know they are or not. We all do it. Social media would be a bleak place if we didn’t.

Content Makes the Web Better.

Okay, you might contend that corporate blog posts or commercially sponsored content make the web worse, but I would push back on that. Companies are out there creating all kinds of content, from gif spattered listicles to in-depth travelogues, and people are reading it.

But aside from that, let’s consider the alternative to corporate content: more advertisements. Companies are not going to stop advertising on the web, nor would I want them to (I’m in favor of an ad supported internet). Given the options, I would rather see companies producing well thought out blog posts, insightful articles, and hilarious tweets (tell me you don’t follow Arby’s on Twitter).

So why not allow those who have the time and the budget to create the content we admittedly crave?

People like it. We know because it works.

Creating High Quality Content Makes me Feel Good.

I suppose there’s a conversation to be had about whether or not this blog, or any of my social media channels, are high quality content, but I think they are, or I wouldn’t keep doing this. And writing it makes me feel good. Knowing that the five of you might read this blog post and learn something interesting or see things in a different way makes me feel good.

Also? I just love writing. I started my college career as a student of the visual arts, but found along the way that writing is really where my heart lies. Sure, my first love is fiction and that will probably always be true, but this makes me happy too.

Writing content on the web holds the possibility that I might help someone, even if it’s just helping someone feel less alone, or helping someone make a choice or decision of some kind. Even if I never hear from this person. This all goes back to my feelings on art, but that’s a subject for a different blog post.

It’s a Way to Reach Out to People I Would Otherwise Never Reach.

Let’s face it, my sphere of influence all told is pretty small, but it’s even more limited in analog space. I have maybe a hundred people I know who like and/or respect me, and might ask me for advice or hang out with me on a Sunday afternoon. It’s pretty well limited to Northwest Washington State, adding a geographical boundary to that sphere of influence.

But on the web, I can reach people around the world. I don’t, but I can. The kernel of possibility is there. And that makes my world feel both excitingly and terrifyingly large. That, in turn, makes the world feel less lonely and fractured.

You could say that any kind of writing on the web can cause that feeling, but I maintain that this blog is content marketing, as are my social media channels, and thus all of the tools I have for connecting with people around the world.

Content Influences Culture.

One of the incredible things the web has done, whether for good or for ill, is to give us all a much more direct hand in the shape of the culture we live in. Suddenly we’re all connected; discussions can be had, divisions explored (and exploited), consensus can be reached (or not), all of this between people whose reach was previously limited by geography. I think that’s incredible.

Not just that, this cultural influence extends beyond the web. Social media influencers become artists and models, blogs become books and books become best sellers. YouTube stars become organization gurus, and bloggers become journalists.

As much as some of us rail against the corporate influence on the web (again, I’m in favor of an ad supported internet), the web has flattened the media landscape, giving the humblest of us an opportunity to influence culture.

Do some marketers use this superpower for evil? Sure. But some make the choice to influence the culture in positive ways, and those are the moments of confluence that I live for.

Is There A Dark Side? Sure.

One of my instructors in my undergrad days sat the class down for a stern talk. “Marketing,” he said, “is a tool. And that tool can be used for good or for evil.”

Are there people out there marketing hateful ideas? Absolutely, particularly now. Are there corporations socially and environmentally green washing their brands while pursuing oppressive and degrading business practices? There sure are. But there are also companies out there doing good with their marketing budgets.

The web, and content marketing, lend greater reach and power to small businesses for less money than more traditional marketing channels, and those small businesses are more likely to do good with those smaller budgets than are large corporations, with shareholders to keep happy.

And I think, all told, content marketing on the web does more good than harm. And that’s what I’m most interested in in the end; facilitating the need to do good.

This is one of those posts a lot of people seem to make on their blogs, and I don’t really expect anyone to read it or care, but it seems like the sort of thing I should have in my archived posts, I guess. For those of you who are interested, I thought I’d detail how my day goes when I’m not in classes.

There may be a Day in the Life post for when I’m in classes later. I’m not sure. We’ll see how I feel about this format.

My life, I think, is not particularly interesting, but I go through it every day, so what do I know?

6:30 – Wake Up.

This sometimes happens at 7:00 instead. I’ve gotten lazy about wake-up time during the break.

I get up. I have a cigarette and check the weather by standing out on the back deck while I smoke. I feed the cat, and deliver his insulin injection. I take the dog out to go potty. I get dressed in whatever seems comfortable, pack up my laptop, charger, water bottle, and a light breakfast. I load up my keychain pill canister with my morning pills. Then I grab my backpack and go catch the bus downtown.

8:30 – Office Time Begins.

I reach downtown and head to a local coffee shop that offers refills and free wifi. I sit down, pull out my bullet journal, review appointments and errands for the day and use them to build my to-do list. All analog at this point, haven’t even opened my laptop. Sometimes I do this while I’m waiting for a table with an outlet to open up. I eat my light breakfast and swallow my pills with my first cup of coffee.

I read at least two articles about management or marketing or SEO, usually from LinkedIn or my marketing list on Twitter. I note down the website, the author, and the title of the article, along with any interesting takeaways or concepts that require further research. Hopefully I find something worth posting to LinkedIn. On Wednesdays I share a post from this very blog.

I think of something writerly and engaging to post to my Author page on Facebook. I tweet something. I check these items off of my to-do list.

9:30 – Second Cup of Coffee.

Self-doubt begins to creep in. I open my journal and turn to my list of potential blog post topics and pick one or two. I write a blog post or two, and check my scheduled posts to make sure I don’t have a gap coming up.

I look for free stock photos for the new blog posts and upload them to Canva. I forgive myself for not being a designer. I upload the photo(s).

I schedule the blog posts. I sit back in my chair and check social media feeds. This is a compulsion; there is no reason to do it other than that I need a break from the constant focus of writing.

Check to see if there’s anything interesting nearby on Pokemon Go.

I check my email. I consider declaring email bankruptcy and starting over. I realize that there are all kinds of images and marked up book covers in that morass accessible only by the gmail search function. Immediately give up.

11:00 – Third Cup of Coffee.

Starting to feel nauseated from the coffee but got a good amount of caffeine in my system now.

Check to see if that blog post you wrote for a client is live now, and agonize about how to pop it into your online writing portfolio.

Go through old school projects to see if there’s anything left from that era that’s worthwhile. Format some old personal essays for the blog.

Chat with other coffee shop regulars.

Consult your to-do list. Check things off. Add new things. Check for phone calls to be made and appointments to be rescheduled. Make phone calls.

Use the coffee shop restroom without examining the toilet seat. Acknowledge that there is now a stranger’s urine drying slowly on the back of my thigh. Consider what a disgustingly human and poetic image of connection this is. Write it in my bullet journal for a future project.

12:00 – 1:00 – Work is Done. Errands Time.

I run any errands on my to-do list. This takes a minimum of three hours to do by bus because buses bend time. In a bad way.

I’m in the bad part of my caffeine buzz now, starting to feel agitated and a little shaky.

I, of course, skip this part if there are no errands and skip ahead to…

3:00 – 4:00 – Errands Are Complete, Head Home.

Ah, it’s nap time.

4:00 – 5:00 – Housework Time.

I set aside time for housework every day. I don’t always get it done, but setting aside the time makes it more likely that I will.

The housework usually involves the kitchen, dishes, etc. I have technically vacuumed before. Sometimes I do laundry or scrub the toilet.

I feel virtuous and absolved for about fifteen minutes.

5:00 – 6:00 – Dinner.

Usually leftovers. Eaten at my desk, usually while watching YouTube.

5:30 – 6:30 – Self Care Time.

Get personal care stuff under control, like detangling my hair and clipping my nails and taking my evening pills. I tell myself I’ll meditate but usually don’t. Feed the cat, give him his second dose of insulin. Sometimes, I even shower.

7:00 – Video Games.

Sometimes I don’t feel like video games, and in those cases I peruse YouTube for delicious video content. Usually though, I do feel like video games. Hop on Discord voice chat.

9:30 – Nighttime Chores.

I scoop the litter box, brush my teeth, take the dog out to potty, add water to the humidifier and empty water from the dehumidifier (as needed). I give myself one more chance to decide to meditate. I usually tell myself I will do it tomorrow night.

The cat gets another feeding because if I don’t feed him right before bedtime he will wake me up at 4:30 in the morning.

I close out the day in my bullet journal. I am not as good about this as I would like you to think I am, so let’s just say I do it every night. I migrate undone to dos to future dates. I add some to-dids to make myself feel better about my day. I move any blog post ideas, fiction ideas, notes for future therapy sessions, and other errata to their respective pages in the journal. I consult my monthly calendar for any appointments for the next day, and look up bus schedules as needed.

10:00 – Bedtime.

Get in bed. Put on a sleepcast. Kick the wrinkles out of my top sheet. After an hour to ninety minutes, fall asleep.

That’s it.

Now you know what it takes to be an unemployed MBA student on summer break. Do you have what it takes?